How to recognize the signs of Parkinson’s disease

This summer, my 86-year-old neighbor Warren Gilman found out that he has Parkinson’s disease. Parkinson’s disease is a disorder of the nervous system that affects how a person moves. The most common first sign of Parkinson’s is a tremor, but Warren’s hands are as steady as they ever were. His sharp-eyed wife Emma noticed some other worrisome signs, though.
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If you have a thyroid nodule does it mean cancer?

Lee, who’s in her 60s, thought she might have thyroid cancer a few years ago when a CT scan she had for something else showed a lump or a nodule on her thyroid. Further testing came back suspicious for papillary cancer, the most common type of thyroid cancer. “Suspicious” doesn’t automatically mean cancer, but Lee’s odds were 60 to 70 percent. The next step was surgery to find out for sure.
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DVT: Are You at Risk?

I’d like to introduce my sister-in-law Donna Lamer. She’s my husband’s sister and I can safely say she is my favorite sister-in-law on that side of the family because she is my only one. I’d say it anyway! (That’s her husband Russ in the picture.) Nine years ago, Donna developed a blood clot in a deep vein in her right leg and ended up in the hospital for a week. The condition is called deep vein thrombosis or DVT. Pieces of the clot or thrombus, as it’s also called, had broken off and traveled up to her lung. Potentially a life-threatening situation.
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How to handle an ache in your hip that becomes a pain in the neck

It happens at least a few times a week. When it does it can take Dee’s breath away. You might think I’m talking about her sweet grandson’s laugh or her husband’s smile from across the room. Happily, those things occur quite frequently and yes, they do take her breath away, but this other thing — well, it’s not much fun. In fact, it hurts quite a bit.
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How to figure out your osteoporosis risk

If you’re a woman over 50, chances are your bones have lost some strength over the years. Most people’s bones are as strong and dense as they’ll ever be between the ages of 18 to 25. By the time you reach 35, density begins to gradually decrease until menopause. After menopause, bone loss happens more rapidly — as much as 20 percent in five to seven years.
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Valuable heart attack advice that could save your life

A friend of mine ended up in the emergency room this past weekend. She was walking in the woods behind her home — something she does nearly every day —when she felt a squeezing pain in her chest. She didn’t think she was having a heart attack, but the pain wouldn’t go away and she was scared to death that it was a warning sign. 
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A Hard-Learned Lesson About Shingles

It was the beginning of a Labor Day weekend when Al felt a strange sensation on his right buttock, just underneath his back pocket where he carried his wallet. It was kind of sore and kind of itchy.
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Six Infections to Watch Out For in Elderly People

As we get older, unfortunately, we become more susceptible to infections. That’s because, with age, the immune system doesn’t work as well as it used to. It gets even more difficult if you are also dealing with chronic health conditions such as diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD or emphysema), heart problems or cancer.
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Important Facts About Pneumonia

Many years ago, my elderly friend Delphine was rushed by ambulance to the emergency room because a slight cold suddenly turned worse and she began acting confused. The doctor listened to her lungs and ordered a chest x-ray, which showed she had pneumonia. I had visited her in the nursing home just a few days earlier and she seemed fine.
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